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Carol Whitney's picture

Expert advice on ways to motivate and stimulate gifted children

Carol S Whitney, PhD
Gifted Teaching Consultant/Educational Therapist with Twice-Exceptional Specialty
Joy Lawson Davis's picture

Expert advice for parenting culturally diverse gifted learners

Joy Lawson Davis, Ed.D.
Educational Consultant & Associate Professor of Education
Joanna Simpson's picture

How to understand the socioemotional needs of your gifted teenager

Dr. Joanna D. Simpson
Assistant Professor of English Education & Literacy
Jean Sunde Peterson's picture

Help gifted kids navigate their complex social and emotional world

Jean Sunde Peterson, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita, Purdue University
Ernie Vecchio's picture

Parents can encourage and shape their gifted, compassionate children

Ernie L. Vecchio
Author, Psychologist, & Speaker
Dina Brulles's picture

Expert advice on seeking school support for your gifted child

Dina Brulles, Ph.D.
Director of Gifted Education
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Raising Gifted Kids

Is my child extremely smart or actually gifted? It's a question many parents ask when they see their children doing well at school and academically leading their peers.Giftedness is defined as a greater ability to understand and to transform perceptions into intellectual and emotional experiences. Gifted children see the world differently because of the complexity of their thought processes and their emotional intensity.The higher a child’s IQ, the more difficulty he/she has finding playmates and conforming to the school curriculum. The greater the discrepancy between a child's strengths and weaknesses, the harder it is for him/her to fit in.Gifted students often struggle in the classroom due to a lack of peer connections, boredom, feelings of isolation, a lack of motivation when things are difficult, perfectionist tendencies that sabotage their work and lack of follow-through. These can lead to bad grades and low school satisfaction.Many parents don't understand the unique needs and challenges of their gifted kids. At ExpertBeacon, our educational and parenting experts can help you navigate the complex world of gifted children and help you understand ways to support your kids.

Ensuring a happy and productive summer for high-ability learners

Summer should be a time of happy self-discovery for children. For those who have gifted or high-level abilities, summer also can be a time to unwind and pursue interests or activities that are not quite so academic. Scholastic pursuits can be put aside, and kids can engage wholeheartedly in imaginative play, collaboration, exploration and invention.

Dr. Joanne FosterEducation Specialist

Joanne Foster, EdD, is co-author (with Dona Matthews) of the award winning Being Smart about Gifted Education (2009, Great Potential Press) and Beyond Intelligence: Secrets for Raising Happily Productive Kids (2014, House of Anansi Press). As a ...

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Expert advice for parenting culturally diverse gifted learners

Culturally diverse parents encounter many challenges and exciting experiences when raising and nurturing gifted learners. This article provides advice for parents as they navigate the journey of raising and parenting culturally diverse gifted learners.

Joy Lawson Davis, Ed.D.Educational Consultant & Associate Professor of Education

Over the past thirty plus years, I have served in multiple roles in gifted education. I have been a resource teacher of the gifted, local district coordinator, State Department of Education Specialist for Gifted Programs in Va (5 years); grant c...

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Help gifted kids navigate their complex social and emotional world

Parenting gifted kids does not need to be perfect. No recipes guide us, and effectiveness and adequacy are impossible to measure exactly. However, common sense, attention to roles and boundaries, and thoughtful adult behavior are extremely important. The practical admonitions included in this article will help gifted children navigate their social and emotional worlds at home, in school and in the community.

Jean Sunde Peterson, Ph.D.Professor Emerita, Purdue University

Jean Peterson, Ph.D., professor emerita, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, was a classroom or gifted-education teacher for 25 years before her doctoral studies in counseling and development at The University of Iowa. She has focused most of...

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Recognize gifted characteristics to help you raise your gifted child

Children who are gifted have a set of characteristics that are often misunderstood. We may think of smartness as advanced academic ability, expecting gifted children to be the star pupils and the A students. And sometimes they are. Giftedness certainly includes advanced intellectual abilities and a love of learning.

Paula Prober, M.S.Licensed Counselor

Paula Prober, M.S., M.Ed. is a licensed counselor in private practice in Eugene, Oregon. Over the 30 years she has worked with the gifted, Prober has been a teacher, consultant, adjunct instructor with the University of Oregon and a guest presen...

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Empower gifted kids to maximize the benefits of their sensitivities

So often, when parents and teachers work with gifted children who are highly sensitive, we try to protect children from their own selves. Our intentions have merit because nobody wants to see someone they care for--especially a child--experience pain.

But attempts at saving kids from their very nature can actually hurt children by not only sending them a message that there is something wrong with them at their core, but also by conditioning them to deny, bury or avoid emotions they are destined to experience due to their nature.

Regina HellingerLife Coach

Regina Hellinger is a professional Life, Leadership, and Career Coach who works with clients all over the world via phone and video conferencing. She is also co-founder of Volare Leadership, launching emerging adults into their personal leaders...

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Help gifted kids cope with and conquer their fear and anxiety

It is customary for gifted children to be advanced in their thinking, have strong imaginative and creative abilities, and oftentimes, to be highly sensitive. However, the combination of these characteristics can give rise to experiences of worry and anxiety.

Dan Peters, PhDLicensed Psychologist, Executive Director

Dan Peters, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist who has devoted his career to the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and families, specializing in those who are gifted, creative, and twice-exceptional (2e). As a parent of three chi...

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Guiding gifted children to lead productive and fulfilling lives

Gifted kids are quite complex. Some consider them to “have it all” and that everything comes easy for them. And others think of gifted kids as being very smart and extremely good at school. While gifted kids are smart, some don’t necessarily do well in school for a variety of reasons. These include attending a poor school or a bad teacher fit, a lack of intellectual and academic challenge, or experiencing personal learning, emotional and social challenges. In short, gifted kids are at risk for lack of school engagement, underachievement, social isolation, depression and anxiety.

Dan Peters, PhDLicensed Psychologist, Executive Director

Dan Peters, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist who has devoted his career to the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and families, specializing in those who are gifted, creative, and twice-exceptional (2e). As a parent of three chi...

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Parents can help their gifted students develop executive functions

Bright kids are often organizationally-challenged. In fact, the brighter they are, the more likely it is that they will have issues with organization. Some of the typical behaviors found in gifted students who are organizationally challenged include not being able to manage time well and losing important papers or possessions. Many of them have difficulty with transitions. They get completely absorbed in what they are doing and don’t want to move on—whether it’s dinnertime, time to go to bed, time to change activities at home or at school, or time to go home.

Dr. Ellen D. Fiedler, Ph.D.Educational Consultant / Professor Emerita

Dr. Ellen D. Fiedler, Professor Emerita from the Master in Arts in Gifted Education (M.A.G.E.) program at Northeastern Illinois University, is currently a private educational consultant. She regularly provides professional development for school...

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Navigating the challenges of raising and schooling a gifted child

Rhonda L. Stern CEO, Educational Enrichment Consulting Educational Enrichment Consulting

Gifted students are unique. Typically, they are more intense and perceptive than most children. While it can be a challenge to understand their needs and identify what motivates them, they have amazing potential. Parents who pay attention to the unique traits of gifted kids will have an easier time navigating the challenges of raising and schooling a gifted child.

Rhonda L. SternCEO, Educational Enrichment Consulting

Rhonda Stern is a graduate of Northwestern Law School and a certified mediator. Ms. Stern has been in the field of gifted and talented education for since 2000. She is currently enrolled at DePaul University, seeking a doctorate in Curriculum...

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Understanding the unique characteristics of gifted children

Raising gifted children is an extremely important parental challenge. Many parents wonder: How can I challenge my children to use their gifts? How do I support my child emotionally? How do I pick the best school? How do I get teachers and administrators to care about my child’s special needs? And what do I do next to develop my child’s potential?

While it can be rewarding to raise a curious, sensitive and introspective child, it is also a difficult task. Parents need a great deal of stamina, patience, introspection, fearlessness and endless support.

Dr. Barbara Klein EDD PHDChild psychologist, educational consultant, author

Dr. Klein has a doctorate in child development and clinical psychology. She is an identical twin and the author of 8 books in the fields of psychology and education with 3 of those books on twin relationship. She has worked with families of gift...

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Expert advice on ways to motivate and stimulate gifted children

Carol S Whitney, PhD Gifted Teaching Consultant/Educational Therapist with Twice-Exceptional Specialty Dr. Carol S. Whitney

Motivating gifted children can be tricky. Because learning comes easily to them and many schools are inordinately concerned with standardized testing scores, gifted students may not receive the kind of attention and guidance they need to reach their full potential. Teachers may assume that these talented children will “get it on their own” and not give them the challenges that are appropriate and necessary for their development.

Carol S Whitney, PhDGifted Teaching Consultant/Educational Therapist with Twice-Exceptional Specialty

Dr. Carol Strip Whitney is a gifted education specialist and founder of Gifted Services of Dublin, located just outside of Columbus, Ohio. Previously, she initiated and built the Dublin, Ohio gifted program to a staff of 12 teachers and also st...

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How to understand the socioemotional needs of your gifted teenager

There is plenty of research on the socioemotional needs of gifted adolescents and how important it is for these needs to be met. A parent can conduct a simple internet search to figure out why giftedness seems like less of a “gift” and more of a burden when it comes to negative socioemotional characteristics of gifted teens.

Dr. Joanna D. SimpsonAssistant Professor of English Education & Literacy

Dr. Joanna Simpson is an Assistant Professor of English & Literacy Education at Kennesaw State University. At KSU, she also coordinates the Gifted Endorsement Program, and the Middle Grades Urban Education Option. Dr. Simpson is an expert on gif...

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Parents can encourage and shape their gifted, compassionate children

Helping children activate their inner compass when dealing with life problems takes practice. Especially when the default choice for this guidance is their ego. Unknowingly, parents and culture overlook the mutual benefit that gifted compassionates have to observe without judgment, feel without fear and find direction in the dark. Encouraging these abilities provides a wonderful model for emotional, psychological and spiritual health.

Ernie L. VecchioAuthor, Psychologist, & Speaker

Ernie Vecchio, author, psychologist, and speaker is bringing groundbreaking insights to the public about a new wisdom on human suffering. He states: “I want to lift this elusive veil that hides our potential, personal truth, and share a definiti...

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Expert advice on seeking school support for your gifted child

Gifted children have distinctive learning needs. Many come to school with very advanced knowledge in certain subjects, strong areas of interests, the facility to think critically and the ability to learn more quickly than their peers.

To learn at their challenge level, these students may require structures and supports in school that allow them to move beyond the regular curriculum. Parents of gifted and talented children recognize this need and frequently find themselves advocating for differentiated learning opportunities at their schools.

Dina Brulles, Ph.D.Director of Gifted Education

Dr. Dina Brulles is the Director of Gifted Education at Paradise Valley Unified School District where she has developed a continuum of gifted education programs, preschool through high school. Dina is also the Gifted Education Program Coordinato...

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Teaching gifted students stress management skills to combat stress

Stress is a very real presence in all of our lives. It can be even more intense for gifted kids because of the nature of giftedness. Specifically, gifted individuals have the tendency to be more sensitive, intense, introspective and emotional. Growing up gifted is a qualitatively different experience. This can manifest itself in the complex way a gifted individual feels and emotes when confronted with stressful situations.

Terry BradleyGifted Education Consultant

Terry Bradley is the Gifted & Talented Advisor at Fairview High School in Boulder, Colorado, and the President-elect of the Colorado Association for Gifted Children. She provides workshops to train educators to lead discussion groups for both st...

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Effective strategies for developing self-esteem in your gifted child

When kids feel good about themselves, they are willing to take more risks academically and socially. For gifted kids, this is particularly important because if they don’t take risks academically, they tend to feel bored and dissatisfied. And socially, they will not make or keep as many quality friendships.

Lisa Van Gemert, M.Ed.T.Education Architect and Gifted Education Expert

Lisa’s favorite way to be described is “Ambassador of the Gifted.” She speaks and writes about all things related to gifted education and effective thinking, and is a frequent conference speaker and professional development facilitator. She pu...

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Expert advice on finding the best school for your gifted child

It is quite common for parents to seek out advice on gifted education. Parents want to know everything they can--from which school is doing the best job and who really cares about gifted children--to who will provide the best education for my child and meet his/her specific needs?

Dr. Ellen D. Fiedler, Ph.D.Educational Consultant / Professor Emerita

Dr. Ellen D. Fiedler, Professor Emerita from the Master in Arts in Gifted Education (M.A.G.E.) program at Northeastern Illinois University, is currently a private educational consultant. She regularly provides professional development for school...

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Supporting the academic success of twice-exceptional learners

Rhonda L. Stern CEO, Educational Enrichment Consulting Educational Enrichment Consulting

One of the most complicated issues in gifted education is the identification of gifted students, who also have a learning disability. These students, known as twice-exceptional (2e), have the ability to mask their learning disability by using compensation strategies. Not surprisingly, the disability also masks their gifted potential, so these students are typically overlooked as gifted by school staff. To most teachers, gifted students with learning disabilities appear very average, so no interventions are developed to foster their giftedness.

Rhonda L. SternCEO, Educational Enrichment Consulting

Rhonda Stern is a graduate of Northwestern Law School and a certified mediator. Ms. Stern has been in the field of gifted and talented education for since 2000. She is currently enrolled at DePaul University, seeking a doctorate in Curriculum...

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Parenting gifted children and helping to develop their potential

Parenting gifted children can be challenging and exhausting. Gifted children are extremely curious, always on the go and constantly asking questions--many of which cannot be answered without taking time to research the topic. These children learn quickly with less repetition and are able to recognize relationships.

Parents of gifted children understand that giftedness is developmental. These parents realize they play an important role in the development of gifted potential. They strive to encourage and support their children’s exploration of topics related to their interests.

Dr. Beverly A. TrailGifted Education Consultant

Beverly A. Trail Ed.D. coordinates the Gifted Education Program at Regis University and is author of the best-selling book Twice-Exceptional Gifted Children: Understanding, Teaching, and Counseling Gifted Students. Dr. Trail earned a doctorate...

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