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Marcia Eckerd's picture

How can parents help their kids develop essential social skills?

Marcia Eckerd, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Stephanie Wright's picture

Create daily routines for children with weak executive functions

Stephanie Wright, CPO ®
Certified Professional Organizer
Susan Izeman's picture

Positive prevention strategies can decrease a child's behaviors

Susan Izeman, PhD, BCBA-D
Board Certified Behavior Analyst
Julie Marks Kotler's picture

How can parents support children when a marriage turns rocky?

Julie Marks Kotler, LCPC, LCPAT, ATR-BC
Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor, Registered Art Therapist
Kathy Gruver's picture

How can families successfully manage their stress together at home?

Kathy Gruver, PhD
Host of The Alternative Medicine Cabinet and author of three books on health
Averi Schaubman's picture

Manage difficult child behaviors with collaborative problem solving

Averi L. Schaubman, LCSW, BCD
Collaborative Problem Solving: A Positive Approach to Working with Kids with Challenging Behaviors
Joanne Caye's picture

Supporting kids through the healing process after a disaster

Joanne S Caye
Clinical Associate Professor
Lucie Lawrence's picture

Embracing and accepting autism can help kids build friendships

Lucie P. Lawrence, PhD
Family Communication and Disability Specialist
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Tackling Family Problems and Conflict

Occasional conflict is a common part of family life. It is quite normal to disagree with family members; however, continuous and ongoing conflict can be stressful and extremely damaging to relationships. Because many stages of life can create conflict, such as the birth of a baby, the teenage years, separation or divorce, financial worries, or moving to a new home, it is very important to work as a team. Consider ExpertBeacon part of this team as our family therapists and psychologists help you communicate in positive ways, reduce conflict, compromise, negotiate, and manage power imbalances and strong emotions.

How can parents help their kids develop essential social skills?

Elementary-age children frequently have problems with social relationships, particularly kids with ADHD and/or learning disabilities. They might be impulsive and bossy. They might miss the nonverbal cues that signal how others respond to them. Children who are slow processors or those with language problems have trouble keeping up with conversations. Anxiety is often a problem when children have had bad experiences in their relationships, and they expect failure.

Marcia Eckerd, Ph.D.Licensed Psychologist

Dr. Eckerd is a licensed psychologist in practice since 1985. She specializes in working with individuals individuals dealing with cognitive rigidity, anxiety, and poor emotional control, social understanding or social skills. She trained extens...

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Positive prevention strategies can decrease a child's behaviors

Do you have a child with challenging behavior? Do you avoid certain activities or situations because you are not sure how your child will behave? Do you find yourself yelling a lot, and then feeling guilty about yelling?

While major behavior change can be a slow process (just remember the last time you tried to make that New Year’s exercise resolution stick), there are a few basic things you can do now to get you and your child back on the right track.

Susan Izeman, PhD, BCBA-DBoard Certified Behavior Analyst

Susan Izeman has been working with children and adults with Autism and related disorders for more than 30 years. Sue has worked with children as young as not quite 2 and with adults in their 20s and 30s. Sue is a Board Certified Behavior Analy...

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How can parents support children when a marriage turns rocky?

Anyone who has been married knows that marriage is not easy. Marriage is especially difficult when you and your spouse have trouble parenting, managing money or are experiencing life transitions. But how can you help your children through this time without too much disruption?

Julie Marks Kotler, LCPC, LCPAT, ATR-BCLicensed Clinical Professional Counselor, Registered Art Therapist

Maintaining relationships, being a parent and getting all you want out of life can be challenging. Finding balance can be the difference between happiness and dysfunction. In my practice, I work with you to help develop creative strategies for d...

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Manage difficult child behaviors with collaborative problem solving

Averi L. Schaubman, LCSW, BCD Collaborative Problem Solving: A Positive Approach to Working with Kids with Challenging Behaviors Collaborative Consultation & Counseling, LLC

We have all seen a child’s outburst in the grocery store. Often, the parent attempts to minimize the scene by ignoring the behavior, pleading with the child to stop, or by encouraging compliance through the promise of a reward or the threat of a consequence. Rarely does this situation end in a positive result for either the child or the adult--and usually the behavior happens again on the next visit to the store.

Averi L. Schaubman, LCSW, BCD Collaborative Problem Solving: A Positive Approach to Working with Kids with Challenging Behaviors

I am a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with almost 30 years of experience working with kids with challenging behaviors and their families. For 27 years, I worked as a school social worker in a local district with some of the most challenging stu...

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Good parenting can help prevent teens from using drugs and alcohol

There are many challenges to parenting, especially when children enter the teenage years. Teen drug and alcohol use is a common problem that parents face. Often, they feel there is little they can do to change their teen’s behavior. But scientific studies and clinical experience suggest that parents can use certain parenting skills to effectively influence their teenagers’ behavior.

Ken Winters, Ph.D.Senior Scientist

Ken Winters, Ph.D. is the director of the Center for Adolescent Substance Abuse Research, a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Minnesota, and a Senior Scientist with the Treatment Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA....

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Recipe: Black-eyed pea salsa

Here is a great salsa recipe that you can make with your kids that fosters fun and creativity in the kitchen. Make it as a side dish with dinner -- or ask your kids to make it for a snack during an afternoon play date. Enjoy!
Angie E. Mielke, Ph.D.Clinical Psychologist

I am a clinical psychologist with advanced, post-doctoral training specializing in perinatal, infant, and early childhood mental health, I provide clinical services within the context of the parent-child relationship supporting the transition to...

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Create daily routines for children with weak executive functions

Getting kids on board with organizing is not always the easiest of tasks. Trying to organize a child with weak executive functions (the self-regulating skills that help us plan, organize, make decisions, shift between situations/thoughts, and control our emotions and impulsivity) can be even more overwhelming for both parent and child.

Stephanie Wright, CPO ® Certified Professional Organizer

Stephanie Wright holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics from the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California. She has an educational background, specializing in working with children and young adults diagnosed with learning disabilities, ...

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Put an end to clutter and arguments by organizing your playroom

Too much clutter? Too many toys? Too much time spent cleaning up? Too many arguments about clean up? If this sounds familiar, you are not alone. By implementing some simple organizing systems and regular routines, you and your children can create a fun, functional playroom that the entire family can enjoy.

Joanna MonahanLiberator

Joanna Monahan is a graduate of the Major Mom Academy Class of July 2013. To Joanna, organization doesn’t mean perfection. Rather, it means finding the most efficient way to complete necessary recurring activities, while allowing ample room for...

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How can families successfully manage their stress together at home?

Kathy Gruver, PhD Host of The Alternative Medicine Cabinet and author of three books on health Alternative Medicine Cabinet

Stress is a killer in our society. Between work, home, school, finances, environment influences and our own thoughts, stress is influencing us on all levels. But it is important to remember that stress is not really the problem. Rather, it is our reaction to that stress. And this reaction can be controlled. While stress can be challenging to manage, it is far easier to navigate when approached together as a family.

Kathy Gruver, PhDHost of The Alternative Medicine Cabinet and author of three books on health

Dr. Kathy Gruver is the host of the national TV show based on her first award winning book, The Alternative Medicine Cabinet and has earned her PhD in Natural Health. Kathy was featured on Lifetime Television’s The Balancing Act in 2011 speaking...

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Supporting kids through the healing process after a disaster

Joanne S Caye Clinical Associate Professor School of Social Work, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

With the increased presence of social media, computers, TVs and smart phones, today’s parents are challenged with determining how to respond to their children’s questions and reactions after a disaster. How do you talk to your 6-year-old daughter about the children who were killed in Newtown, Connecticut? What is the best way to open a conversation with your teenage son about safety without making him--or yourself--unreasonably fearful?

Joanne S CayeClinical Associate Professor

MSW, 1982, UNC Chapel Hill Doctoral Candidate in Education, North Carolina State University Social worker for local and state agencies for 20 years Taught in the School of Social Work for 20 years, currently a Clinical Assistant Professor Ta...

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Embracing and accepting autism can help kids build friendships

About 1 in 88 children have an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to estimates from the CDC’s Autism and Development Disabilities Monitoring Network. In fact, today’s statistics show that 1 to 1.5 million Americans live with an ASD—the fastest-growing developmental disability.
 
With the increase in children diagnosed on the autism spectrum, mainstreaming is becoming a favored educational approach for students with ASD. The reason: studies show that students with disabilities benefit from being in a general education classroom, both academically and socially.
 

Lucie P. Lawrence, PhDFamily Communication and Disability Specialist

Lucie Lawrence has a Ph.D. in human communication studies, with a concentration in family communication, disability and interpersonal relationships, from the University of Denver. Additionally, she holds a master's degree in journalism from the ...

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Cooking as a family fosters fun and creativity in the kitchen

It’s dinnertime and everyone is at the table. As dinner is being served, words such as, “I don’t like this” or “This tastes yucky” start to emerge from little mouths. Parental frustration sets in. Phrases of defense quickly strike back: “You won’t leave this table until you have had 4 bites of broccoli”! Sound familiar?

Angie E. Mielke, Ph.D.Clinical Psychologist

I am a clinical psychologist with advanced, post-doctoral training specializing in perinatal, infant, and early childhood mental health, I provide clinical services within the context of the parent-child relationship supporting the transition to...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles