Ray McNulty's picture

How teachers can guide and help motivate at-risk students

Ray McNulty
Chairman of Advisory Board
Charisse Beach's picture

Advice for teachers to reduce truancy and keep kids in school

Charisse Beach
Author, Educator, Illinois State Board of Education Certified and National Presenter
Charisse Beach's picture

How to inspire and motivate students to participate in class

Charisse Beach
Author, Educator, Illinois State Board of Education Certified and National Presenter
Charisse Beach's picture

Advice for teachers on how to recognize and reduce school violence

Charisse Beach
Author, Educator, Illinois State Board of Education Certified and National Presenter
Andrew Davis's picture

Ensure success in the classroom for kids on the autism spectrum

Andrew Davis, M.A.D.S., B.Sc. (Honours)
Training Institute Faculty
Terry Bradley's picture

Using discussion groups to help nurture growth in gifted students

Terry Bradley
Gifted Education Consultant
Erin Yourtz's picture

Advice for creating safe and welcoming schools for LGBT youth

Erin Yourtz, MSW
Public School Consultant - Equity and Engagement
Susan Kabot's picture

Organizing the classroom for students with autism spectrum disorder

Susan Kabot, EdD, CCC-SLP
Licensed speech-language pathologist
John Bailie's picture

Advice for teachers to help prevent misbehavior in their classroom

Dr. John Bailie
Assistant Professor and Director of Continuing Education
Paula Kluth's picture

Create an inclusive classroom that helps all types of students

Paula Kluth, Ph.D.
Consultant, Author, Advocate, and Independent Scholar
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Teacher and Classroom Resources

Teachers and professors need some help everyone now and then too. Whether you are a first time primary school teacher looking for advice on building a lesson plan and how to handle problem students, or a tenured college professor wanting to know how to more effectively communicate with your students, ExpertBeacon has it.  Look to our experienced educators to help you in all of your classroom and curriculum needs.

How teachers can guide and help motivate at-risk students

Ray McNulty Chairman of Advisory Board Penn Foster High School

Home life for at-risk teens is often far from inspired. Growing up without direction or mentorship, these troubled teens can walk a path toward failure paved in low-self esteem.

But with the proper support and encouragement, even the seemingly unmotivated can become optimistically resilient. Studies show the untapped potential of at-risk youth, stating that one-third of high-risk children will beat the odds and lead healthy, productive lives. As a teacher, you have what it takes to change a student’s path forward and perhaps even their family tree for generations to come

Ray McNultyChairman of Advisory Board

With nearly 40 years of experience as an educator, administrator, and education reform expert, Ray supports and drives the academic vision and mission for Penn Foster High School as Board Chairman. He believes that the education system cannot wa...

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How to inspire and motivate students to participate in class

Charisse Beach Author, Educator, Illinois State Board of Education Certified and National Presenter At-Risk Students: Education & Evolution

Before we can effectively motivate students to participate in class, we must identify the various ways student participation can be structured. Each method provides differentiated opportunities to encourage participation from all learners. The most common method is whole-class discussion, valuing all responses, which helps less confident students to feel more comfortable participating. “Cold-calling? is the teacher asking questions and randomly calling on students to answer. This method tends to measure the quality of student responses.

Charisse BeachAuthor, Educator, Illinois State Board of Education Certified and National Presenter

Charisse Beach has over twenty years experience as an educator, fourteen years as a school administrator. She served as principal of Premier Academy- Joliet, a Regional Safe School Program designed to provide alternative education for at-risk mi...

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Ensure success in the classroom for kids on the autism spectrum

Teaching a child or youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be a challenging feat for even the most seasoned educators. This articles offers some tips and strategies that can easily be implemented in the classroom to ensure success for you and your student.

Andrew Davis, M.A.D.S., B.Sc. (Honours)Training Institute Faculty

Andrew first became interested in autism when completing his Bachelor of Science degree at Queen’s University. After graduating in 2003 he immediately began working as a therapist in Geneva Centre for Autism’s early behavioural intervention prog...

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Advice for creating safe and welcoming schools for LGBT youth

School bullying, once seen as an inevitable rite of passage, is now recognized by experts as a pervasive and serious problem that has significant negative impacts on the academic achievement, educational aspirations and psychological well-being of all students. In order for students to achieve in school and develop the social and emotional skills they need to succeed as adults, we must ensure that schools are safe and welcoming for everyone.

Erin Yourtz, MSWPublic School Consultant - Equity and Engagement

Ms. Yourtz earned her degree from the DU Graduate School of Social Work, focusing on policy and anti-oppressive community practice. She has managed a statewide grant program for school districts piloting anti-bullying programs, trained educators...

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Advice for teachers to help prevent misbehavior in their classroom

Dr. John Bailie Assistant Professor and Director of Continuing Education International Institute for Restorative Practices

Being a teacher with students who regularly misbehave can be a troubling aspect of the academic world. It can cause you to lose hope with your students and ultimately become unhappy with your job in general. Fortunately, there are ways in which you, as an educator, can encourage your students to behave in and outside of the classroom, without simply sending them to the principal’s office or to detention. And it all starts in the classroom.

Dr. John BailieAssistant Professor and Director of Continuing Education

Dr. John Bailie directs the Continuing Education programs for the International Institute for Restorative Practices (IIRP) in the U.S. and abroad. With the IIRP's SaferSanerSchools program, he has brought restorative practices to hundreds of sch...

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Meeting the unique needs of gifted children within the classroom

Marcy Stagner Teacher, Curriculum Specialist, Educational Consultant, Yoga Instructor

With large class sizes and individual student needs, ensuring that each and every student is appropriately challenged can be difficult. And when teachers have gifted kids in their classroom, meeting the needs of these students in the general education classroom setting is challenging. Educating gifted students is not always intuitive and can require a great deal of flexibility and creativity. The following guidelines will help teachers educate gifted students in their classroom so that these students can be challenged in their education and reach their full potential.

Marcy StagnerTeacher, Curriculum Specialist, Educational Consultant, Yoga Instructor

Marcy Stagner is a certified teacher in elementary education and also holds an endorsement in gifted education. She received her BA in elementary education from Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado and her MA in curriculum and instruction wit...

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Advice for teachers on great parent-teacher conferences

Parent-teacher conferences can conjure up some pretty negative images. As educators, we either tend to tread too lightly by desperately trying not to offend, or too heavily by coming across like drill sergeants. Thus, finding that middle ground where you can have a productive, authentic meeting between the parent and the teacher with the goal being to benefit the student. Here is some helpful expert advice when holding parent-teacher conferences.

Mindy Keller-KyriakidesEducator

Mindy Keller received her B.A. degree in English from Florida Atlantic University in 1997, graduating summa cum laude, and began teaching in 1998. Her career spans from teaching remedial to advanced courses in English, as well as required and e...

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Bloom's Taxonomy

Elisa Robyn, PhD Assistant Dean of School of Humanities and Social Sciences Regis University
Bloom’s taxonomy presents a classification of learning that helps educators create an effective curriculum. Usually presented as a pyramid, this classification describes levels of learning, from the most basic to the most advanced.
Elisa Robyn, PhDAssistant Dean of School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Dr. Elisa Robyn has a diverse academic and professional background. She has a Masters degree in Geology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and spent six years working for a major oil company as an exploration/well-site geologist. ...

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Tips for designing a course

Elisa Robyn, PhD Assistant Dean of School of Humanities and Social Sciences Regis University

After the joyful experience of being hired to teach a college class comes the often gut wrenching fear accompanying the realization that we have to design a course. For the most part, your experience with course design comes from reading a syllabus as a student. You know when a course worked well and when it worked poorly, but you often do not know why. Course design is a big part of the answer. Here are some tips to help you design a well rounded and effective course.

Elisa Robyn, PhDAssistant Dean of School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Dr. Elisa Robyn has a diverse academic and professional background. She has a Masters degree in Geology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and spent six years working for a major oil company as an exploration/well-site geologist. ...

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How to handle unruly students

Disruptive students drive us crazy. The stress incurred is one of the primary reasons that so many teachers leave teaching. What’s tricky though, is figuring out how to cope with situations that are in the gray zone: behavior that is not so awful that we have to send students to the dean (such as fighting), but just awful enough to make us grind our teeth down to nubs. By taking a deep breath and thinking before we act, we’ll be more successful at gaining control.

Mindy Keller-KyriakidesEducator

Mindy Keller received her B.A. degree in English from Florida Atlantic University in 1997, graduating summa cum laude, and began teaching in 1998. Her career spans from teaching remedial to advanced courses in English, as well as required and e...

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Get your class to settle down

Whether you’re beginning a lesson or transitioning from a larger activity to a more focused one, getting the class to settle down can be a challenge. It’s very stressful because our class time is so limited, but students sometimes do everything in their power to derail the class. Using a concrete, readily understood, non-verbal procedure is the cornerstone of settling students down.

Mindy Keller-KyriakidesEducator

Mindy Keller received her B.A. degree in English from Florida Atlantic University in 1997, graduating summa cum laude, and began teaching in 1998. Her career spans from teaching remedial to advanced courses in English, as well as required and e...

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Advice for teachers to reduce truancy and keep kids in school

Charisse Beach Author, Educator, Illinois State Board of Education Certified and National Presenter At-Risk Students: Education & Evolution

Truancy—the act of a student skipping school—has been clearly identified as one of the early warning signs of students headed for potential delinquent activity. It is critically important to identify those who have disengaged and are perhaps already skipping classes, and provide support for re-engagement.

Charisse BeachAuthor, Educator, Illinois State Board of Education Certified and National Presenter

Charisse Beach has over twenty years experience as an educator, fourteen years as a school administrator. She served as principal of Premier Academy- Joliet, a Regional Safe School Program designed to provide alternative education for at-risk mi...

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Advice for teachers on how to recognize and reduce school violence

Charisse Beach Author, Educator, Illinois State Board of Education Certified and National Presenter At-Risk Students: Education & Evolution

Many children come to school carrying their burdens along with their books. By default, teachers must divide their efforts to focus on addressing issues, which place students at risk of participating in school violence. Most educators readily admit they are inadequately informed and unprepared for this immense task.

Charisse BeachAuthor, Educator, Illinois State Board of Education Certified and National Presenter

Charisse Beach has over twenty years experience as an educator, fourteen years as a school administrator. She served as principal of Premier Academy- Joliet, a Regional Safe School Program designed to provide alternative education for at-risk mi...

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Using discussion groups to help nurture growth in gifted students

Discussion groups are groups where gifted kids get together to talk about issues they have in common and how life looks and feels through the lens of giftedness. These groups are typically facilitated by adult leaders who are knowledgeable about giftedness.

The most crucial school-based support for gifted students is an appropriate educational fit that differentiates instruction for students’ abilities and needs. This promotes a student’s academic development. Also important are discussion groups as a school-based intervention for gifted students.

Terry BradleyGifted Education Consultant

Terry Bradley is the Gifted & Talented Advisor at Fairview High School in Boulder, Colorado, and the President-elect of the Colorado Association for Gifted Children. She provides workshops to train educators to lead discussion groups for both st...

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Organizing the classroom for students with autism spectrum disorder

Whether being educated in general settings or in special education settings, students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) do better when their classroom environments are well organized and there are consistent routines that are followed throughout the day. Organization of the classroom includes organizing the physical space, as well as the staff and time throughout the day.

Susan Kabot, EdD, CCC-SLPLicensed speech-language pathologist

Susan Kabot, EdD, CCC-SLP, is the Executive Director of the Autism Institute at Nova Southeastern University’s Mailman Segal Center for Human Development in Fort Lauderdale. She has spent the last 28 years there developing and administering pro...

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Create an inclusive classroom that helps all types of students

Even though most educators see students with a range of learning needs each day in their K-12 classrooms, having a student with a label of autism, cerebral palsy, or Down syndrome can feel intimidating or overwhelming. Teachers often worry that they don’t have the education or experience to support students with identified needs.

Paula Kluth, Ph.D.Consultant, Author, Advocate, and Independent Scholar

Dr. Paula Kluth is a consultant, author, advocate, and independent scholar who works with teachers and families to provide inclusive opportunities for students with disabilities and to create more responsive and engaging schooling experiences fo...

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Make your classroom safe for weather and violent emergencies

Today school safety encompasses all aspects of keeping staff and students safe and secure in the learning environment. For teachers who have both a legal and an ethical duty to protect, providing a safe environment is now one of the cornerstones of any educational program. As the primary custodians of students during the school day, classroom teachers must be prepared for any and every situation that may present a danger to themselves or others.

John MatthewsExecutive Director

John Matthews is the Executive Director of the Community Safety Institute (CSI) and an Assistant Chief Deputy Constable for the Dallas County Constable’s Office Precinct #1. Matthews has developed over 100 law enforcement and public safety initi...

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Teachers: Get help communicating with parents

“But the teacher said...But my mother wants...? All too often, we hear students utter these phrases, for any number of reasons: to avoid confrontation, to invoke blame, or maybe just because they don’t know what else to say. As teachers, we should try to make sure that they are never put in the position of a go-between for the adults in their lives. Parent/teacher communication is one of the most significant keys to a student’s academic success, and students need to see their adult role models not just merely communicating, but communicating effectively, authentically, and positively.

Mindy Keller-KyriakidesEducator

Mindy Keller received her B.A. degree in English from Florida Atlantic University in 1997, graduating summa cum laude, and began teaching in 1998. Her career spans from teaching remedial to advanced courses in English, as well as required and e...

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Dos and Don'ts of teaching non-traditional students online

Elisa Robyn, PhD Assistant Dean of School of Humanities and Social Sciences Regis University

Returning to school can be a challenge for an adult learner, especially in an online environment. Adult non-traditional learners are highly motivated, but often have a number of concerns about returning to school. In order for these students to succeed, the faculty must be a mentor, a facilitator, a cheerleader, and a holder of high standards, and sometimes even a friend.

Elisa Robyn, PhDAssistant Dean of School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Dr. Elisa Robyn has a diverse academic and professional background. She has a Masters degree in Geology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and spent six years working for a major oil company as an exploration/well-site geologist. ...

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Dos and Don'ts of grading discussion boards

Elisa Robyn, PhD Assistant Dean of School of Humanities and Social Sciences Regis University

Discussion boards are a wonderful feature of online courses, if they are used well. With online learning becoming a stable at all colleges and universities, there is increased interest in the many ways that a discussion board can be used as a forum for exploring the content, a tool for building community, and an objective method of grading. This article will explore some dos and don’ts for faculty using and grading discussion boards that will help keep the process manageable and less subjective.

Elisa Robyn, PhDAssistant Dean of School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Dr. Elisa Robyn has a diverse academic and professional background. She has a Masters degree in Geology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and spent six years working for a major oil company as an exploration/well-site geologist. ...

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How do I get my students to ask questions?

It’s a unique silence...that silence that follows, “Are there any questions?? You pause, hold your breath and wait. When no questions seem forthcoming-you figure you must have done a heckuva job with your explanation! You give the go-ahead for the activity. However, when you receive the follow-up work, it’s obvious the students didn’t “get? the assignment. You wonder, why didn’t they just ask me?

Mindy Keller-KyriakidesEducator

Mindy Keller received her B.A. degree in English from Florida Atlantic University in 1997, graduating summa cum laude, and began teaching in 1998. Her career spans from teaching remedial to advanced courses in English, as well as required and e...

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